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First Operational Activity for MDA’s Ambulance-Bus

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On Friday, July 3, MDA’s unique and first of its kind intensive care bus was called for the evacuation of 9 residents from a nursing home in southern Israel who were diagnosed with Corona virus.

All of the patients were evacuated by the bus in one trip to the Corona Health Care Geriatric Center located in the center of the country.

The unique bus, which was introduced about a month and a half ago, allows the evacuation of up to thirteen patients and injured, with two of them evacuated lying in the middle of the bus, which is equipped with intensive care equipment, and eleven others sitting in the back.

Sirens and an advanced communication system are installed in the bus, enabling the crews in different parts of the bus to contact MDA. The evacuation to the hospital today saved nine ambulances needed to perform such a task.

The MAN company buses are converted inner-city busses and measure just under 40 feet/ 12 meters in length, 2.5 meters wide, and 2.47 meters high.

The three parts of the bus are completely separate from each other with opaque partitions. Thus, even in the case of evacuating infectious patients, the driver does not require PPE.

In order for the driver to keep in touch with teams and evacuees at all times, there is a communication system that allows them to speak. In addition, the driver has access to cameras that are located throughout the bus.

In the middle of the bus, there are two beds with equipment suitable for ALS care. Two paramedics are appointed to treat patients who are lying in this part, while they can see through the camera what is happening in the back, where up to eleven evacuees can be transported in stable or light condition.

There is also an advanced life support equipment, which includes, among other things, defibrillators that can also perform ECGs, and automated chest compressions devices.

Above each seat in the back of the bus, there is an oxygen tap. The eleven taps are fed by four large oxygen tanks, which are connected to a special system located in the front of the bus.

There are also two refrigerators on the bus that are designed to store blood and medicines that need to be refrigerated.

In addition to all of this, the bus is powered by V230 power outlets, which allow additional medical equipment to be connected if needed, such as ECMO, incubator and the like.

The evacuation bus is an emergency vehicle for all intents and purposes, and is equipped with lights, siren, and an announcement system, similar to a MICU. In addition, the bus is connected to MDA’s radio system.

The cameras in the bus are also connected to MDA Medical Dispatch Center, so doctors and senior paramedics from the hotline can see what is going on and, if necessary, advise the bus’s team and participate in decision making.

In terms of hygiene and ICP, the bus has a special oxygen exchange system that can, according to the Ministry of Health, replace all the air in the vehicle in just seven minutes.

For quick and efficient cleaning, the bus seats are made of leather, and each has a seat belt. On top of that, the bus’s power outlets are waterproof, so the vehicle can be disinfected without fear of electric shock.

Finally, TV screens have been installed on the bus to ease the evacuees’ time. The windows of the bus are sealed, and looking inside the bus from outside is impossible.

In addition, at the rear of the bus there are compartments for storing personal belongings of the evacuees. The bus is accessible for the disabled, and a special ramp for passenger transport is installed.

Eli Bin, MDA Director General, said: “As the national EMS organization of the State of Israel, MDA teams spend days and nights in developing means for saving lives and provide medical response efficiently and quickly. We will continue to face every challenge at any time and wherever it is needed.”

In the back of an ambulance, two paramedics tend to a patient who has recently experienced a miscarriage

The Miscarriage Association Launches New E-learning Resource for Medical Professionals

View the Free E-Learning Course Here: Bit.ly/2Gtniu9

Published in Ambulance Today, Issue 3, Volume 13, Ahead of the Curve, Education and Technology Special, Autumn 2019

Dealing with the trauma of a miscarriage is something one can only imagine without having experienced it themselves. Non-profit charity, the Miscarriage Association, explains how they are currently supporting medical professionals in providing care and understanding to women going through that very trauma, through the use of a fantastic new, completely free to use, e-learning resource.

Founded in 1982, the Miscarriage Association is a UK-wide charity that offers support and information to anyone affected by miscarriage, ectopic or molar pregnancy.

Along with a staffed helpline, the Miscarriage Association have developed a new e-learning resource to support medical professionals in providing the best possible care to women experiencing pregnancy loss.

The resource is based on the real experiences of health professionals and those who have experienced miscarriage, ectopic or molar pregnancy, and also includes a cache of films and interactive activities.

“Not being able to answer their questions is very difficult and makes me feel like I’m inadequate in my job, when in fact I’ve just not had adequate training.”

Taking only around two hours to complete, the new resource is an excellent tool for continuing professional development and learning towards revalidation.

Ruth Bender Atik, National Director at the Miscarriage Association, said: “Pregnancy loss can be a deeply distressing experience and the support health professionals give can make all the difference to helping women through this difficult time.

“We know it isn’t always easy for those working in clinical environments to find the time to reflect on the care they provide. This is why we wanted to create a resource that they can dip in and out of and access easily from their phone, iPad or computer, so the training is available to them anytime.”

The five units focus upon different aspects of care, such as having difficult conversations, considering language, and taking care of your own wellbeing while providing that care.

“I was on my own at home. I couldn’t walk, I was on the floor so I had to call an ambulance. The paramedics were wonderful. They called my husband, asked if there was anyone else I needed contacting. They locked my house. They made sure that just the basic little things that really mattered were done and dealt with. And they gave me some gas and air, which I needed.”

Having experienced two miscarriages herself, Cerian Gingell is passionate about improving the care that is provided to those who experience pregnancy loss.

Cerian, said: “Miscarriage is a devastating loss, often without explanation. Nothing can take the
pain away, but a kind word, the correct information on what to expect next, the truth about what’s happening – these things can all help make a horrible experience slightly less horrible.

“To me, good care is saying ‘I’m sorry your baby’s gone, it wasn’t your fault’. It’s letting me cry, answering my questions with honesty and sensitivity, reassuring me that because it’s happened once it doesn’t mean it’ll happen again. It’s about respect, sympathy and honesty.

“I think this resource is so important and will help create more consistent care across the country. Every single person that goes through pregnancy loss deserves to be treated with dignity and compassion. Whether they’re speaking to their GP or being treated in hospital, every contact can have a huge impact on the way that person copes with their loss.”

The new e-learning resource was peer reviewed and produced with the help of Janet Birrell, Gynaecology Matron at Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Dr Nicola Davies, GP at The Pinn Medical Centre, Annmaria Ellard, Miscarriage Specialist Nurse at Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust, Amanda Mansfield, Consultant Midwife at London Ambulance Service NHS Trust, and the Association of Early Pregnancy Units.

Dr. Sarah Bailey, Lead Nurse Recurrent Miscarriage Care and Clinical Research Specialist at University Hospitals Southampton, said: “The Miscarriage Association’s e-learning resource is extremely useful, informative and easily accessible.

“I would thoroughly recommend this excellent training package to any care professional who is involved in caring for women with miscarriage.”

The Miscarriage Association’s staffed helpline and online resources help thousands of people every year to get through the emotional and physical distress of pregnancy loss and, in many cases, to manage the anxiety of pregnancy after loss. They work with health professionals to promote good practice in medical care, support clinical research and strive to raise public awareness of the facts and feelings of pregnancy loss.

You can visit www.miscarriageassociation.org.uk or call the Miscarriage Association on +44 1924 200 795 to find out more. For more details and interview opportunities please contact Ruth Bender Atik, National Director at the Miscarriage Association: ruth@miscarriageassociation.org.uk

You can access the e-learning resource at: Bit.ly/2Gtniu9